Mount Duneed Schools

Mount Duneed Regional Primary School began education in the area very early as Bream Creek School no 107 which changed its name to St. Wilfred’s Denominational School, Mount Duneed before becoming part of the government education system as Mount Duneed State School No. 2036

1868

Bream Creek school changes name

Mt Duneed Primary School originated from school No. 107 Bream Creek, which was established on 1st of June 1862 by the Church of England authorities under the control of the Denominational Board, later to become a Common School.

The first school was a slab building (made from slabs of split or sawn timber), with Mr Lewis as Head Teacher.

Education was not compulsory, neither was it free. Every Monday morning the pupils took along their weekly fees to the Head Teacher.

1868
1865

Name Change

The name was officially changed to Mount Duneed in 1865

1865
1868

Enrolment increase

By 1868 over 100 children were attending the school and so a pupil teacher was added to the staff.

1868
1875

Land purchased

On the 11th of June 1875, land was purchased for a State School.

1875
1878

School Opens

Mount Duneed State School opened on 1st of March 1878 in a magnificent stone building costing 1,238 pounds which was to serve the district well. Andrew Abercrombie, the teacher of the church school, was appointed as the first HT with 131 pupils.

1878
1928

Enrolments decline

After the 50th Jubilee in 1928 enrolments had declined to such an extent at both Mount Duneed and Freshwater Creek that both schools became part-time schools, with the teacher, Mr McGregor alternating between them both, one week spending three days at one and two at the other, then doing the opposite the following week.

1928
1939

School Closure

Finally, in 1939, Mount Duneed closed, and did not reopen until four years later.

The old school building was built of brick on stone foundations. There was a gallery in the school. Large photos of the first teachers were hung on the walls. Also above the large fire place an Honour Roll of the Mount Duneed residents from the First World War was a central feature. Each year school and district picnics were held at Torquay and dances and euchre parties were held in the building to raise much needed funds for the school.

1939
1944

Fire

The stone building was destroyed on January 14th, 1944, during a bush fire, and so the fourth building to serve the district was erected. It was unfortunate that the bush fire also destroyed all the early educational records of the district.

1944
1946

Temporary buildings

Temporary accommodation had to be used until completion of the a new school in 1946 with enrolments falling during this time.

1946

Keith Cecil writes of the school’s history in an unpublished manuscript supplied by Anglesea Historical Society –
Four buildings have been erected at Mount Duneed (originally called Mount Direction) for educational purposes.

The second was also a primitive structure and served the purpose until 1863.

Mr Lewis was transferred to Germantown (now Grovedale) and Miss Isabella Stewart became the Head.

She was succeeded by her brother Alexander, who was later to become Chief Inspector of Schools. Because of an increase in attendance his sister Miss Lily Stewart was appointed as assistant. This led to the erection of a more up to date stone building, which was later to become the local Church of England Church. This institution became a Common School; education was not compulsory, neither was it free. Every Monday morning the pupils took along their weekly fees to the Head Teacher.

By 1868 over 100 children were attending the school and so a pupil teacher was added to the staff. In 1878, on 11th February, State School No 2036 was begun in a magnificent stone building which was to serve the district well.

After the 50th Jubilee in 1928 enrollments had declined to such an extent at both Mount Duneed and Freshwater Creek that both schools became part-time schools, with the teacher, Mr McGregor alternating between them both, one week spending three days at one and two at the other, then doing the opposite the following week. Finally, in 1939, Mount Duneed closed, and did not reopen until four years later.

The old school building was built of brick on stone foundations. There was a gallery in the school. Large photos of the first teachers were hung on the walls. Also above the large fire place an Honour Roll of the Mount Duneed residents from the First World War was a central feature. Each year school and district picnics were held at Torquay and dances and euchre parties were held in the building to raise much needed funds for the school.

The stone building was destroyed on January 14th 1944, during a bush fire, and so the fourth building to serve the district was erected. It was unfortunate that the bush fire also destroyed all the early educational records of the district.

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